Hope in death comes only from the one who gives life.  That is why the Gospel must be proclaimed in areas he is not known.

Hope in death comes only from the one who gives life. That is why the Gospel must be proclaimed in areas he is not known.

I woke up this morning, ready to preach at Grace, partake of the Lord’s Supper, and then eat some great food at the church wide Mexican dinner.   Then, out of no where, my wife asks me, “Are you flying Air Asia on your trip?”   Surprised I said – “Yes”.  She then informed me that an air Asia flight from Indonesia to Singapore went down somewhere over the Java Sea while we slept.  At that moment I knew leaving home would be harder than I had planned.  

I was thankful for the encouragement I received from several brother and sisters at church.  Many told me they were praying for me and Emma.  Several reminded me to take care of Emma.  Some, who had heard earlier that morning of the downed flight, asked me what airline I was flying.  I appreciated everyone’s concern, and I covet your prayers.

I was surprised when we got home from church that my oldest daughter had still not heard about the accident.  Heidi and I decided to tell her and we were both pleased with her response.  Her attitude was one of sorrow for the families who lost loved ones, but confidence in a God who is in control of all things.  Who would have thought that statistics showing travel by plane is safer than travel by car is not the basis for our hope of a safe journey.  Imagine, putting your faith in a God who knows everything about you, including the number of your days.  

Is leaving home easy?  Not on your life.  But the knowledge of God’s control in all things helps us live obedient lives even when we are called to do what is unfamiliar.